Ballynahinch Castle
stands overlooking the eponymous lake. Today a luxury hotel, the building was originally the home of the powerful Martin family, who ruled over Connemara from 1700 till the tragic period of the Great Famine in 1846-48. The best-known exponent of this great family was Richard (Dick) Martin, founder of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA), who was for that reason nicknamed "Humanity Dick"
All the area is dominated by the view of the Twelve Bens, particularly Bencorr (710 mt) and Benlettery (580 mt), while the lake in front of the Castle -fed by the river of the same name - is home to Ballynahinch Fisheries, a world-renowned fishing area for salmon and rainbow trout. The Reserve is carefully managed, to regulate and monitor the reproduction and the delicate ecosystem of these two species.
Driving along N59 from Clifden to Galway it's possible to see on the right the ruins of O'Flaherty castle, dating back to 1580 and located on a small island in the middle of the lake.

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The town is situated on the isthmus between Ballyconneely Bay and Mannin Bay, about 10 km from Clifden (to the north) and 14 km from Roundstone. Ballyconneely is located under the protective wing of the Doon Hill Fort and can boast some beautiful beaches, as well as a 27-hole golf course, besides some shops, pubs, a church and a post office.
Of some interest is the nearby telegraph station from which Marconi sent a message in Nova Scotia in 1907 and the monument commemorating the landing of Alcock and Brown after their transatlantic flight in 1919. From the square where stands the gigantic commemorative wing you can enjoy a beautiful sight of the town of Clifden.
Artifacts and some evidence of human settlement dating back to more than 5000 years ago have also been recently found in the area.

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A small, quiet coastal village, the center of lobster fishing as well as holidays resort well known to cyclists, anglers, and hikers. A narrow road connects the village to the island of Maighinis (or Mweenish), where there is a research station for marine biology managed by University College Galway. From here you can gaze out towards the west and pinpoint the lonely island of Mac Dara, on which there are the ruins of a church and the burial place of St. Mac Dara. This saint was venerated from the fishermen of the area who used to soak their nets for three times in the waters surrounding the island before sail for fishing. A bit more prosaically, Mac Dara is today the "sponsor" of a religious festival held in Carna in July, a three days gathering for curraghs and hookers (typical boats of the area with bright red sails), with songs, dances and local craft fairs.

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The village, whose Irish name "An Cheathrú Rua" means a red or rugged area, is within the Irish-speaking region (Gaeltacht) of Connemara and is famous for its traditional fishing boats known as Galway Hookers. During Summer many of them are moored at Sruthán and Caladh Thadhg piers. The population is widely dispersed over Carraroe peninsula between Greatman's Bay (Cuan an Fhir Mhóir) and Casla Bay (Cuan Chasla).
Carraroe has an unusual coral beach, Trá an Dóilín, in front of which every June takes place the traditional hookers Race known as "Féile an Dóilín".


This pleasant village (whose Irish name An Cladach dubh means the black beach) stands opposite to Omey Island, from which it is separated by a strip of beach that can be crossed at low tide on foot or by car. The famous Omey Races are held here in August. The island of Omey -Iomaidh- deserves a trip, but be aware of the tide timetable! If you're compelled to stay on the island, there are no pubs where enjoying a pint of Guinness but, while waiting for low tide, you can visit the ruins of the church of San Feichin, a saint still fervently venerated by locals. The Gaelic name for the island, "Iomaidh Feichin" actually means "bed of Feichin".
The coastal area lying between Cleggan and Claddaghduff is known as Aughrus Peninsula, and offers impressive views of the ocean and the islands.

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